This AI tech may spot unseen signs of heart failure

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New York, Oct 19 | US researchers have developed an electrocardiogram-reading algorithm that can detect subtle signs of heart failure.

Heart failure, or congestive heart failure, occurs when the heart pumps less blood than the body normally needs. For years, doctors have relied heavily on an imaging technique called an echocardiogram to assess whether a patient may be experiencing heart failure.

While helpful, echocardiograms can be labour-intensive procedures that are only offered at select hospitals.

In the study, the researchers at Mount Sinai described the development of an artificial intelligence (AI)-based computer algorithm that not only assessed the strength of the left ventricle but also the right ventricle, which takes deoxygenated blood streaming in from the body and pumps it to the lungs.

The algorithm was 94 per cent accurate at predicting which patients had a healthy ejection fraction and 87 per cent accurate at predicting those who had an ejection fraction that was below 40 per cent.

The algorithm also learned to detect right valve weaknesses from the electrocardiograms with 84 per cent accuracy at predicting which patients had weak right valves.

“We showed that deep-learning algorithms can recognise blood pumping problems on both sides of the heart from ECG waveform data,” said Benjamin S. Glicksberg, Assistant Professor of Genetics and Genomic Science at Mount Sinai.

For the study, published in the ‘Journal of the American College of Cardiology: Cardiovascular Imaging’, the team programmed a computer to read patient electrocardiograms along with data extracted from written reports summarising the results of corresponding echocardiograms taken from the same patients.

In this situation, the written reports acted as a standard set of data for the computer to compare with the electrocardiogram data and learn how to spot weaker hearts.

“Our results suggest that this algorithm could be a useful tool for helping clinical practitioners combat heart failure suffered by a variety of patients,” added Glicksberg. “We are in the process of carefully designing prospective trials to test out its effectiveness in a more real-world setting.”

Source: IANS

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Elon Musk asks hard-hitting AI engineers for job

Elon Musk asks hard-hitting AI engineers for job

Tesla founder and CEO Elon Musk on Monday tweeted that he is hiring Artificial Intelligence (AI) engineers who are passionate about solving day-to-day problems through AI

San Francisco, Dec 6 | Musk hiring engineers to solve problems that affects people’s lives. Tesla founder and CEO Elon Musk on Monday tweeted that he is hiring Artificial Intelligence (AI) engineers who are passionate about solving day-to-day problems through AI.

“As always, Tesla is looking for hardcore AI engineers who care about solving problems that directly affect people’s lives in a major way,” Musk tweeted along with a link to apply for the job.

Interested candidates can apply by filling in fields like name, email, exceptional work done in software, hardware or AI, dropping their resume in the PDF format and hitting the Apply option.

As per the website, Tesla’s AI and Autopilot unit develops and deploys autonomy at scale in vehicles, robots and more.

“We believe that an approach based on advanced for vision and planning, supported by efficient use of inference hardware, is the only way to achieve a general solution for full self-driving and beyond,” the website read.

In a 2014 interview, Musk said he looked for “evidence of exceptional ability” in a potential employee, rather than a degree from a prestigious university.

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“There is no need even to have a college degree at all, or even high school,” Musk said during an interview with the German automotive publication Auto Bild about his hiring preferences more broadly.

“If somebody graduated from a great university, that may be an indication that they will be capable of great things, but it’s not necessarily the case. If you look at, say, people like Bill Gates or Larry Ellison, Steve Jobs, these guys didna¿t graduate from college, but if you had a chance to hire them, of course that would be a good idea.”

Source: IANS

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