NASA completes rocket engine test series for lunar mission

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Washington, Oct 4 | NASA has successfully completed its rocket engine test series for its upcoming missions to the Moon and, eventually, Mars.

The US space agency conducted RS-25 single-engine Retrofit-2 test series at Stennis Space Center near Bay St Louis in Mississippi on Septemeber 30, the agency said in a statement.

“This successful test series for the Space Launch System RS-25 engine puts us one step closer to manufacturing the first new set of engines for future Artemis missions to the Moon,” said Johnny Heflin, manager of the SLS liquid engines office at NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama, in the statement.

“We are testing engine parts made with advanced manufacturing techniques that can reduce the cost of each engine by more than 30 per cent yet still maintain the RS-25 engine’s reliability and high performance,” Heflin added.

During the test, hot fire, operators fired RS-25 developmental engine No. 0528, used for each of the seven tests in the series, for more than eight minutes (500 seconds), the same time required during an actual launch.

The test series provided valuable information to Aerojet Rocketdyne — lead contractor for the SLS engines — as it produces engines for use after the Artemis IV mission to the Moon, NASA said.

Operators collected hot fire data to demonstrate and verify various engine capabilities, and to evaluate new engine components manufactured with cutting-edge and cost-saving technologies and reduce operational risk.

The test was initially delayed due to impacts from Hurricane Ida, which struck the Gulf Coast region on August 29.

NASA is building SLS as the world’s most powerful rocket. Four RS-25 engines, along with a pair of solid rocket boosters, will help power SLS at launch. Firing simultaneously, the engines will generate a combined 1.6 million pounds of thrust at liftoff and 2 million pounds during ascent.

With Artemis, NASA will land the first woman and the first person of colour on the lunar surface and establish long-term exploration at the Moon in preparation for human missions to Mars.

SLS and the Orion spacecraft, along with the commercial human landing system and the Gateway in orbit around the Moon, are NASA’s backbone for deep space exploration. The agency is working towards the launch of the Artemis I uncrewed flight test in upcoming months, which will pave the way for future missions.

Source: IANS

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Elon Musk asks hard-hitting AI engineers for job

Elon Musk asks hard-hitting AI engineers for job

Tesla founder and CEO Elon Musk on Monday tweeted that he is hiring Artificial Intelligence (AI) engineers who are passionate about solving day-to-day problems through AI

San Francisco, Dec 6 | Musk hiring engineers to solve problems that affects people’s lives. Tesla founder and CEO Elon Musk on Monday tweeted that he is hiring Artificial Intelligence (AI) engineers who are passionate about solving day-to-day problems through AI.

“As always, Tesla is looking for hardcore AI engineers who care about solving problems that directly affect people’s lives in a major way,” Musk tweeted along with a link to apply for the job.

Interested candidates can apply by filling in fields like name, email, exceptional work done in software, hardware or AI, dropping their resume in the PDF format and hitting the Apply option.

As per the website, Tesla’s AI and Autopilot unit develops and deploys autonomy at scale in vehicles, robots and more.

“We believe that an approach based on advanced for vision and planning, supported by efficient use of inference hardware, is the only way to achieve a general solution for full self-driving and beyond,” the website read.

In a 2014 interview, Musk said he looked for “evidence of exceptional ability” in a potential employee, rather than a degree from a prestigious university.

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“There is no need even to have a college degree at all, or even high school,” Musk said during an interview with the German automotive publication Auto Bild about his hiring preferences more broadly.

“If somebody graduated from a great university, that may be an indication that they will be capable of great things, but it’s not necessarily the case. If you look at, say, people like Bill Gates or Larry Ellison, Steve Jobs, these guys didna¿t graduate from college, but if you had a chance to hire them, of course that would be a good idea.”

Source: IANS

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