Milky Way galaxy is not homogeneous as previously thought

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London, Sep 9 | Astronomers have observed the composition of the gases in our galaxy and have shown that, contrary to the models established until now, they are not homogeneously mixed.

To understand the history and evolution of the Milky Way, astronomers have been studying the composition of the gases and metals that make up an important part of our galaxy. Three main elements stood out: the initial gas coming from outside our galaxy, the gas between the stars inside our galaxy — enriched with chemical elements –, and the dust created by the condensation of the metals present in this gas.

“Until now, theoretical models considered that these three elements were homogeneously mixed and reached the Solar composition everywhere in our galaxy, with a slight increase in metallicity in the centre, where the stars are more numerous,” added Patrick Petitjean, a researcher at the Institut d’Astrophysique de Paris, Sorbonne University in Paris, France.

For 25 hours, a team of scientists observed the atmosphere of 25 stars using Hubble and the Very Large Telescope (VLT) in Chile. They found that the dust cannot be counted with these spectrographs, even though it contains metals.

A team at University of Geneva (UNIGE) in Geneva, Switzerland therefore developed a new observational technique and demonstrated that these gases are not mixed as much as previously thought.

“It involves taking into account the total composition of the gas and dust by simultaneously observing several elements such as iron, zinc, titanium, silicon and oxygen. Then we can trace the quantity of metals present in the dust and add it to that already quantified by the previous observations to get the total,” said Annalisa De Cia, Professor in the Department of Astronomy at the UNIGE.

The environment that makes up the Milky Way brings together the metals produced by the stars, the dust particles that have formed from these metals, but also gases from outside the galaxy that regularly enter it, they explained.

As a result of the findings, detailed in the journal Nature, simulations of the Milky Way’s evolution will have to be modified.

“This discovery plays a key role in the design of theoretical models on the formation and evolution of galaxies,” said Jens-Kristian Krogager, researcher at the UNIGE’s Department of Astronomy.

“From now on, we will have to refine the simulations by increasing the resolution, so that we can include these changes in metallicity at different locations in the Milky Way,” Krogager added.

Source: IANS

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Elon Musk asks hard-hitting AI engineers for job

Elon Musk asks hard-hitting AI engineers for job

Tesla founder and CEO Elon Musk on Monday tweeted that he is hiring Artificial Intelligence (AI) engineers who are passionate about solving day-to-day problems through AI

San Francisco, Dec 6 | Musk hiring engineers to solve problems that affects people’s lives. Tesla founder and CEO Elon Musk on Monday tweeted that he is hiring Artificial Intelligence (AI) engineers who are passionate about solving day-to-day problems through AI.

“As always, Tesla is looking for hardcore AI engineers who care about solving problems that directly affect people’s lives in a major way,” Musk tweeted along with a link to apply for the job.

Interested candidates can apply by filling in fields like name, email, exceptional work done in software, hardware or AI, dropping their resume in the PDF format and hitting the Apply option.

As per the website, Tesla’s AI and Autopilot unit develops and deploys autonomy at scale in vehicles, robots and more.

“We believe that an approach based on advanced for vision and planning, supported by efficient use of inference hardware, is the only way to achieve a general solution for full self-driving and beyond,” the website read.

In a 2014 interview, Musk said he looked for “evidence of exceptional ability” in a potential employee, rather than a degree from a prestigious university.

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“There is no need even to have a college degree at all, or even high school,” Musk said during an interview with the German automotive publication Auto Bild about his hiring preferences more broadly.

“If somebody graduated from a great university, that may be an indication that they will be capable of great things, but it’s not necessarily the case. If you look at, say, people like Bill Gates or Larry Ellison, Steve Jobs, these guys didna¿t graduate from college, but if you had a chance to hire them, of course that would be a good idea.”

Source: IANS

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