IANS Review: ‘Babloo Bachelor’: Amusing, but only with bits of hilarity (IANS Rating: **1/2)

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By Troy Ribeiro
Film: Babloo Bachelor (running in theatres)

Duration: 135 minutes

Director: Agnidev Chatterjee

Cast: Sharman Joshi, Pooja Chopra, Tejashri Pradhan, Aakash Dabhade, Rajesh Sharma, Neeraj Khetripal, Sumeet Gulati, Asrani, Beena Bhat and Raju Kher

IANS Rating: **1/2

‘Babloo Bachelor’ is a simple romantic drama with a hackneyed premise. Nevertheless, it is executed with earnestness. Set in Lucknow, ‘Babloo Bachelor’ is the story of Ranvijay aka Babloo, a zamindar’s son who basks in his father’s glory. A simpleton and a writer of sorts, Babloo in his endeavour to find “the perfect bride” has rejected many proposals.

Very soon, the best matchmaker of Lucknow, Premanand Tiwari (Asrani), is roped in to find a perfect match for Babloo, who by now is tainted as the eternal bachelor.

At 35 and under duress, Babloo is introduced to Avantika (Pooja Chopra), an ambitious young woman who confesses to him that she had five boyfriends in the past. Babloo agrees to marry her, despite her confession, after being convinced by his best friend Chotu (Aakash Dabhade) that having affairs is a norm in modern times.

It does not take long for Babloo to fall head-over-heels with Avantika. But a few days before the wedding, Avantika confesses to him that she is not interested in settling down with an unambitious man and requests him to call off the wedding.

Once again, the heartbroken Babloo finds himself asserting that he is jinxed to remain a bachelor all his life. A few months later, at his cousin’s wedding, he chances upon Swati (Tejashri Pradhan), an aspiring actress who takes advantage of Babloo’s naivety and forces him to marry her. How she does not allow him to consummate the marriage forms the crux of the tale.

Director Agnidev Chatterjee’s oeuvre seems to be mounted on an outdated and perfunctory script packed with high-handed dialogues mouthed by Babloo’s dad (Rajesh Sharma) and frivolous ones by Chotu and Babloo’s uncle (Manoj Joshi).

Treated in a lighter vein, the plot, though focused, lacks the seriousness to connect emotionally. The comic scenes appear to be amateurishly handled and the resultant humour appears trite and forced.

On the performance front, the actors delivers their part with sincerity. Sharman Joshi, as the middle-aged, dejected Babloo, fits the bill perfectly. He brings a comedic heart to the character, who seems to prefer staying in his comfort zone.

He displays a subdued nervousness, which is in contrast to selfish and mean streaks of the characters played by Pooja Chopra and Tejashri Pradhan’s selfish and mean streak. Pooja and Tejashri deliver their parts competently, but their scenes with Sharman lack chemistry on-screen.

Aakash Dabhade and Sumeet Gulati (who plays his cousin) are over-the-top, loud and stereotyped in their roles, but they are relatable. Given Asrani’s talent, in a minuscule part, he is short-changed by the script.

The songs, despite being loud, are melodious and well-picturised, considering the film’s moderate production values. The numbers ‘Kasam’, ‘Aye Meri Zindagi’, ‘Jiya Nahin Lagta’, ‘Banna Banni’, ‘Jealous’ and ‘Tum Ho’ mesh seamlessly into the narrative, bringing relief to the staid storytelling.

Overall, ‘Babloo Bachelor’ is a mildly funny but sweet film that will make you smile.

(Troy Ribeiro can be contacted at troy.r@ians.in)

Source: IANS

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Does MBA really help in getting a better job offer ?

Does MBA really help in getting a better job offer ?

Most students pursuing an MBA come with the sole objective of having a decent job offer or a promotion in the existing job soon after completion of the MBA. And most of them take loans to pursue this career dream. According to a recent survey by education portal Campusutra.com  74% MBA 2022-24 aspirants said they would opt for education loans.

There are exceptional cases like those seeking master’s degree or may have a family business to take care of or an entrepreneurial venture in mind. But the exception cases are barely 1%. For the rest 99%, a management degree is a ticket to a dream job through campus placements or leap towards career enhancements. Stakes are high as many of them quit their jobs which essentially means loss of 2 years of income, apprehension and uncertainty of the job market. On top of that, the pressure to pay back the education loans. Hence the returns have to be high. There is more than just the management degree. Colleges need to ensure that they offer quality management education which enables them to be prepared for not just the demands of recruiters and for a decent job but also to sustain and achieve, all along their career path.

  • So, what exactly are the B Schools doing to prepare their students for the job market and make them industry ready ?
  •  Are B schools ready to deliver and prepare the future business leaders to cope up with the disrupted market ?  

These are the two key questions every MBA aspirant needs to ask, check and validate before filling the MBA application forms of management institutes. And worth mentioning that these application forms do not come cheap. An MBA aspirant who may have shortlisted 5 B Schools to apply for, may end up spending Rs 10,000.00 to Rs 15,000.00 just buying MBA / PGDM application forms.

While internship and placements data of some management institutes clearly indicates that recruiters today have specific demands. The skill sets looked for are job centric and industry oriented. MBA schools which have adopted new models of delivery and technology, redesigned their courses, built an effective evaluation process and prepared the students to cope with the dynamic business scenario, have done great with campus placements despite the economic slow down.

However, the skill set being looked for by a consulting company like Deloitte or KPMG may be quite different from FMCG or a manufacturing sector. Institutes need to acknowledge this fact and act accordingly.

  • Management institutes should ensure that students are intellectually engaged, self motivated and adapt to changes fast. In one word ‘VUCA ready’.
  • B Schools should encourage students to participate in national and international competitive events, simulations of business scenarios.
  • Institutes should have the right mix of faculty members with industry exposure and pure academics.

The placement records of 2021 across top management institutes indicated the fact that recruitment is happening, skilled talent is in demand and certain management institutions continued to attract recruiters even in the middle of an ongoing crisis.

It is time, all management institutes rise to the occasion, understand market realities and identify areas of improvement at both ends – students and faculty.

After all, the stakes are high at both ends. B Schools taking corrective measures will stay while those which are lagging will end up shutting down.

Author Name : Nirmalya Pal

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